Tag Archives: Peace

The Psychology of Projection in Conflict

afghan-kid-fists-tk

Afghan boy in Kabul is a reflection of the violence he has witnessed in his brief life. Photo by Tim King

I have chosen and quoted words to illustrate my discussion about the significance of projection and the importance of unconscious emotional content in any conflict.

Robert J. Burrowes Global News Centre

(TASMANIA)    Understanding human conflict requires us to understand human psychology. And it is only when we understand the psychology that drives conflict that we can take intelligent steps to address it.

Exposing lies, telling the truth

exposing_VitchekIn ‘Exposing Lies of the Empire’, Andre Vltchek documents, with chillingly violent detail, the sins of Christianity which has wanted converts (at the point of a gun if necessary) and does not tolerate, let alone ‘love thy neighbour’, when the neighbour is of a different faith.

Robert J. Burrowes Global News Centre

(TASMANIA)   I have just read Andre Vltchek’s new book ‘Exposing Lies of the Empire’. http://badak-merah.weebly.com/exposing-lies-of-the-empire.html Let me tell you something about this book of 800 pages.

Vltchek writes with passion and poetry, describing the true horror experienced by the world at large, living at the gunpoint of the imperial powers, while also describing and drawing you into a world of progress, culture and refinement that exists in some places and, so we are tantalised, might exist elsewhere too and even, perhaps, one day for us all.

The active defense of the cultural heritage of humanity

Professor Nicholas Roerich

Professor Nicholas Roerich

There are periods in the history of humanity when some great new ideas are introduced, beneficial for all. Such ideas mark the beginning of a new era with far-reaching effects, creating new conditions for cooperation. The Roerich Pact for the protection of the cultural heritage of humanity signed by 21 States in a Pan-American Union ceremony is such a sign of a new era which transcends all obstacles, prejudices and intolerances.

Article by René Wadlow for Global News Centre

(WASHINGTON DC) 15 April is the anniversary of the signing of the Roerich Peace Pact at the White House in Washington D.C. in 1935.  Henry A. Wallace, then the US Secretary of Agriculture and later Vice-President signed for the USA saying “At no time has such an ideal been more needed. It is high time for the idealists who make the reality of tomorrow, to rally around such a symbol of international cultural unity.  It is time that we appeal to that appreciation of beauty, science, education which runs across all national boundaries to strengthen all that we hold dear in our particular governments and customs.  Its acceptance signifies the approach of a time when those who truly love their own nation will appreciate in addition the unique contribution of other nations and also do reverence to that common spiritual enterprise which draws together in one fellowship all artists, scientists, educators and truly religious of whatever faith.”

Vykom: strategic nonviolent action against untouchability

websiteboyz.com

Mahatma Gandhi image courtesy: websiteboyz.com

The Vykom struggle was designed by Gandhi to eliminate untouchability by ‘converting’ the high caste Hindus ‘by sheer force of character and suffering’.

Robert J. Burrowes Global News Centre

(TASMANIA)  Why does nonviolent action work? And how good was Mohandas K. Gandhi as a nonviolent strategist? If you want high quality evidence in your search for answers to these two questions then I encourage you to read Professor Mary E. King’s latest book on the struggle against untouchability, unapproachability and unseeability in the south Indian village of Vykom during the 1920s. See ‘Gandhian Nonviolent Struggle and Untouchability in South India: The 1924–25 Vykom Satyagraha and the Mechanisms of Change’ http://www.oup.co.in/product/academic-general/sociology/111/gandhian-nonviolent-struggle-untouchability-south-india-192425-vykom-satyagraha-mechanisms-change/9780199452668

History is not always considered instructive and yet the major achievements, and failures, of nonviolent activists throughout the twentieth and now twenty-first centuries can be better understood if we understand what happened at Vykom.

Why do we fear love?

afsc.org

afsc.org

Fear is the opposite of love. If you want someone to do what you want, you are frightened, not loving. The poets and songwriters have long told us that love is ‘letting go’. The person in your cage is not a loved companion; the individual who is genuinely free but chooses to stay feels loved.

Robert J. Burrowes Global News Centre

(TASMANIA)  Why do human beings fear love? That is, why do we fear loving ourselves and others, and why do we fear being fully loved ourselves?

If someone does not receive what they need emotionally as a child, their capacity to give will be limited accordingly. The less of what they need they actually get, the less they will be able to give (and the more they will take for themselves without consideration for others). In order to give, one must have experienced receiving during childhood. If we do not experience love in a way that is truly meaningful, then we will never be able to love ourselves. And if we do not love ourselves, we cannot truly love another.

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